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Illinois
Primarily Central Illinois
Coal & Coal Mining
History & Genealogy
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Coal Mining Disasters in Illinois
      As we look at Coal Mining History, it always seem to come back to remembering the events that arose from the potential hazards that have been associated with the mining of such a precious commodity.
      Historians have disagreed as to who was the first to discover coal in what became the United States of America and the State of Illinois, but in all probability it was Joliet and Father Marquette in 1673 at some place between the present cities of Utica and Ottawa or Father Hennepin in 1668 or 1669 who put a map in his journal of a discovery on the Illinois River near what is now Ottawa, La Salle County, Illinois.
      Before Illinois became a State, William Boon, appears to be the first man who mined coal in 1810 in the present Jackson County, Illinois. In the early 1830s, some records of coal production started being kept, but it was not until 1882 that more accurate reports were being kept by the State of Illinois.
      In the Annual Coal Reports of the State of Illinois, only those "accidents" where more than two were killed at one time are classed as "disasters." Some of these are shown here.
List of Illinois Coal Mine Disasters Reference Sources
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Monuments and Memorials for Illinois Coal Miners

Disasters at Illinois Coal Mines
 
DateCoal MineLocationEvent History
 
January 5, 1880Bernhard Blume Mine Pinckneyville,
Perry County
Flooding
 
February 16, 1883Diamond No. 2 Mine Braidwood,
Grundy County
Flooded / Drowning
 
January 8,1883Coulterville Coal Company Mine
Jones & Nesbet Mine
Coulterville,
Randolph County
Windy Shot Explosion
 
April 20, 1890Spring Valley Coal Company No. 2 Mine Spring Valley,
Bureau County
Mine Fire
 
September 24, 1897Williamson County Coal Company Mine Johnston City,
Williamson County
Fire Damp Explosion
 
October 13, 1902Victor Coal Company Mine Pawnee,
Sangamon County
Windy Shot Explosion
 
February 25, 1903Auburn and Alton Coal Company Mine Auburn,
Sangamon County
Explosion
 
March 13, 1903Cardiff Coal Company Mine Cardiff,
Livingston County
Four Explosions
 
March 23, 1903Athens Coal Company Mine Athens,
Menard County
Powder Explosion
 
March 31, 1903Sandoval Coal Company Mine Sandoval,
Marion County
Blast Explosion
 
May 11, 1904Big Muddy Coal & Iron Company Mine Herrin,
Williamson County
Powder Explosion
 
December 9, 1904Eldorado Coal Company Mine Eldorado,
Saline County
Blownout Shot
 
January 16, 1905Decatur Coal Company Coal Mine Decatur,
Macon County
Fire
 
April 3, 1905Zeigler Coal Company Coal Mine Zeigler,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
December 22, 1906Breese-Trenton Mining Company Coal Mine Breese,
Clinton County
Accident
 
January 29, 1907Big Muddy Coal & Mining Company Coal Mine Johnston City,
Williamson County
Powder Explosion
 
September 7, 1907Dering Coal Company No. 11 Mine West Frankfort,
Franklin County
Gas Explosion
 
October 6, 1908Harrisburg & Southern Coal Company Mine Grayson,
Saline County
Powder Explosion
 
November 5, 1908W. P. Rend Colliery Company Mine Rend City,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
November 19, 1908Benton Coal Company Mine Benton,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
December 12, 1908W. P. Rend Colliery Company Mine Rend City,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
December 31, 1908Spring Valley Coal Company No. 2 Mine Spring Valley,
Bureau County
Fire
No Fatalities
 
January 10, 1909Zeigler Coal Company Coal Mine Zeigler,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
February 9, 1909Zeigler Coal Company Coal Mine Zeigler,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
February 16, 1909Dering Coal Company No. 18 Mine West Frankfort,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
November 13, 1909St. Paul Coal Company
Cherry Coal Mine
Cherry,
Bureau County
Fire
 
December 23, 1909Chicago & Carterville Coal Company "A" Mine Herrin,
Williamson County
Explosion
 
December 27, 1909Centralia Coal Company No. 5 Mine Centralia,
Marion County
Gas Explosion
 
November 11, 1910Shoal Creek Coal Company Mine No. 1 Panama,
Montgomery County
Explosion
 
February 13, 1911Saline County Coal Company No. 3 Mine Harrisburg,
Saline County
Accident
 
October 23, 1911O'Gara Coal Company No. 9 Mine Harrisburg,
Saline County
Explosion
 
January 15, 1913Crescent Coal Company Mine Peoria,
Peoria County
Explosion
 
February 19, 1913Eldorado Coal & Mining Company Mine Eldorado,
Saline County
Gas Explosion
 
October 27, 1914Franklin Coal & Coke Company No. 1 Mine Royalton,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
April 5, 1915Shoal Creek Coal Company No. 1 Mine Panama,
Montgomery County
Explosion
 
July 27, 1915United Coal Company No. 1 Mine Christopher,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
December 8, 1916Johnston City Coal Company Mine Johnston City,
Williamson County
Fire
 
May 12, 1917Saline County Coal Company No. 6 Mine Grayson,
Saline County
Gas Explosion
 
June 2, 1917W. P. Rend Colliery Company No. 2 Mine Weaver,
Williamson County
Gas Explosion
 
July 26, 1917By-Products Coke Corporation No. 18 Mine West Frankfort,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
November 29, 1917Old Ben Coal Corporation No. 11 Mine Christopher,
Franklin County
Gas Explosion
 
December 5, 1917Bell & Zoller Coal Company Mine Zeigler,
Franklin County
Explosions
 
February 22, 1918Citizens Coal Company's "A" Mine Springfield,
Sangamon, County
Explosion
 
February 22, 1918Chicago, Wilmington & Franklin Coal Company,
Royal Mine
Virden,
Macoupin, County
Powder Explosion
 
June 29, 1918O'Gara Coal Company, No. 8 Mine Eldorado,
Saline, County
Fire
 
September 27, 1918Franklin Coal & Coke Company Mine Royalton,
Franklin, County
Gas Explosion
 
May 12, 1919Marion County Coal Company's Mine Centralia,
Marion, County
Explosion
 
June 6, 1919Old Ben Coal Corporation No. 10 Mine Christopher,
Franklin County
Gas Explosion
 
July 24, 1920By Products Coke Corporation No. 18 Mine West Frankfort,
Franklin County
Fire
 
February 14, 1921O'Gara Coal Company No. 8 Mine Eldorado,
Saline County
Gas Explosion
 
February 23, 1921Centralia Coal Company Mine Centralia,
Marion County
Windy Shot Explosion
 
February 23, 1921Union Collieries Company Kathleen Mine Dowell,
Perry County
Jackson County
Fire
 
August 31, 1921Harrisburg Colliery Company Harco Mine Harco,
Saline County
Gas Explosion
 
February 21, 1922Springfield District Coal Company's No. 58 Mine Taylorville,
Christian County
Explosion
 
September 29, 1922Consolidated Coal Company's Lake Creek Mine Johnston City,
Williamson County
Gas Explosion
 
December 6, 1923Aluminum Ore Company's Radium Mine Belleville,
St. Clair County
Drowning
 
January 25, 1924Crerar-Clinch Coal Company
McClintock Mine
Johnston City,
Williamson County
Gas Explosion
 
September 26, 1925Consolidated Coal Company No. 7 Mine Herrin,
Williamson County
Gas Explosion
 
January 29, 1926Chicago, Wilmington & Franklin Coal Company
Orient No. 2 Mine
West Frankfort,
Franklin County
Gas Explosion
 
March 30, 1927Saline County Coal Corporation No. 2 Mine Harrisburg,
Saline County
Gas Explosion
 
December 20, 1927Cosgrove-Meehan Coal Company No. 1 Mine Johnston City,
Williamson County
Gas Explosion
 
January 9, 1928Peabody Coal Company No. 18 Mine West Frankfort,
Franklin County
Gas Explosion
 
December 1, 1929Old Ben Coal Corporation No. 8 Mine West Frankfort,
Franklin County
Gas Explosion
 
March 18, 1930Valier Coal Company Valier Mine Valier,
Franklin County
Gas Explosion
 
October 3, 1931Rennie Brothers Mine Chesterfield,
Macoupin County
Accident
 
December 24, 1932Moweaqua Coal Company Mine Moweaqua,
Shelby County
Gas Explosion
 
August 1, 1936Union Collieries Company Kathleen Mine Dowell,
Jackson County
Fire
 
February 22, 1941Chicago, Wilmington & Franklin Coal Company
Orient No. 1 Mine
Orient,
Franklin County
Shot Explosion
 
December 28, 1941Peabody Coal Company Harco No. 47 Mine Harrisburg,
Saline County
Explosion
 
March 16, 1942Northern Illinois Coal Company No. 10 Mine Wilmington,
Will County
Explosion
 
May 8, 1942Superior Coal Company No. 1 Mine Eagerville,
Macoupin County
Drowning
 
June 17, 1942Truax-Traer Coal Company
Burning Star "Drift" Mine
Elkville,
Jackson County
Accident
 
February 16, 1943Peabody Coal Company No. 24 Mine Danville,
Vermilion County
Powder Explosion
 
July 20, 1944Consolidated Coal Company No. 7 Mine Staunton,
Macoupin County
Rock Fall
 
September 28, 1945Panther Creek Mines, Incorporated, No. 4 Mine Springfield,
Sangamon County
Mantrip Wreck
 
March 25, 1947Centralia Coal Company No. 5 Mine Wamac,
Washington County
Explosion
 
July 24, 1947Old Ben Coal Corporation No. 8 Mine West Frankfort,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
August 14, 1947Chicago, Wilmington & Franklin Coal Company
Orient No. 2 Mine
West Frankfort,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
December 5, 1948Chicago, Wilmington & Franklin Coal Company
Orient No. 1 Mine
Orient,
Franklin County
Roof Fall
 
October 24, 1950Lumaghi Coal Company No. 4 Mine Collinsville,
Madison County
Runaway Pit Car
 
December 21, 1951Chicago, Wilmington & Franklin Coal Company
Orient No. 2 Mine
West Frankfort,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
January 10, 1962Blue Blaze Coal Company No. 2 Mine Herrin,
Williamson County
Explosion
 
January 29, 1963Freeman Coal Company
Orient No. 5 Mine
Logan,
Franklin County
Fire
 
August 15, 1968Freeman Coal Mining Corporation
Orient No. 5 Mine
Logan,
Franklin County
Explosion
 
September 15, 1980Zeigler Coal Company
Spartan No. 2 Mine
Sparta,
Randolph County
Roof Fall
 
July 9, 1986Freeman United Coal Company
Orient No. 6 Mine
Waltonville,
Jefferson County
Roof Fall
 

A Compilation of the Reports of the Mining Industry of Illinois 1930 1
Appendix C.
A Peculiar Tragedy of 1880.
By Stanley Smith.
      To go beyond official records, it is customary to rely on old newspaper files, and on word-of-mouth, handed down from generation to generation. From these sources, an account of a coal mine tragedy that is probably unparalleled among the mine disasters of the state that have been officially recorded is related.
      Rev. W. S. D. Smith, who witnessed the disaster that caused the death of Joseph Niesing, on January 5, 1880, at that time prepared an account of the tragedy for the local weekly publication. It follows:
      "The coal mine of Bernhard Blume was, on last Monday, the scene of a casualty, the most remarkable perhaps ever witnessed at an inland town like Pinckneyville in which water was the destroying element.
      "The mine is situated on a tract of land adjacent to big Beaucoup creek, and on the line of the Wabash, Chester and Western (now Missouri Pacific) just north of town. The shaft is on the railroad track about one-fourth of a mile west of the creek, which at the time of the strange occurrence was at high water mark, the water nearly touching the railroad bridge and extending all over the bottom on both sides of the creek. Just north of the railroad in the field under which the mining operations had been going on was a valley extending probably one-eighth of a mile and covered by the back water from the creek. The mining had been pushed far beyond this and an air shaft had also been sunk. The mine has a roofing of hard limestone, but by the action of the water or some other cause a crevasse existed just underneath the upper end of the swale. The pressure of the back water made a sudden opening through the crevasse, and down, down, sixty feet or more, the water began to pour into the mine below, the death-dealing torrent increasing in volume and momentum and for a short time almost diverting the current of the swollen creek, carrying away whole sections of the rail fence which stood near the bank of the creek, many of the rails as well as other timber and drift wood being caught in the maelstrom and whirled down the capacious throat of the gaping crevasse.
      "Of course it was but the work of a few moments for such a volume of water to fill the main entry, forcing its way in all directions. Toward the shaft it went with tremendous force. Young Blume, a son of the proprietor, who was near the mouth of the shaft feeding or attending to the mules, found himself suddenly engulfed and almost swept away by the tide, and hastily seizing the ropes, signalled the engineer to hoist the cage, which he reached just in time to be lifted from a watery grave, as the column of water with fearful force struck the bottom of the cribbing.
      "About this time the phenomenon of a remarkable waterspout occurred. The vast volume of water forcing its way back in the mine in the direction opposite from the shaft, compressed the air in an extraordinary degree, and having no outlet from its ribbed subterranean cavern, the rebound was such that the descending flood was lifted as by the explosion of an immense quantity of powder, and for several minutes was heaved skyward in vast quantities to the height of at least 100 feet. This tremendous upheaval of water, earth and drift, was succeeded by a few minutes of quiet, during which the floods again poured down the funnel. The air of course was again suppressed, and in due time asserted its supremacy over the ponderous pressure of the water, and again the upheaval began spouting and this time higher than before, filling the spectators with amazement at the sight and sound. This process was twice more repeated, when, the principal volume of air having escaped, the water flooded every portion of the mine, rising in the shaft to the level of the creek -- the time occupied being probably a half hour.
      "But where are the miners during this dreadful conflict of the elements? About two or three hours previous to the break they had all abandoned their work and came out of the mine except poor Joseph Niesing, who thinking there was no danger remained in his room, which was far to the north of the air shaft.
      "How he met his death will, of course, never be known. If still at his post, the probability is, that the first warning he received was the sudden compression of the air which, indeed, must have been the immediate cause of his death.
      "Mr. Niesing was an honest, poor, industrious, hard working man; he leaves a wife and seven children, several of whom are sick, in straightened circumstances. We have no doubt if the friends of this sadly bereaved family will take the matter in hand, circulate a petition, few, if any, of our citizens will be found, but that will contribute something to these sad, unfortunate ones. The sympathy of our community go out to this bereaved family, and let us show our sympathy to be of the substantial kind if we are shown the petition.
      "Mr. Blume is making arrangements to pump the water from the mine as soon as the creek shall have fallen sufficiently, when he proposes to resume mining operations. He has the sympathy of our people in his trouble."
      Thus ends the article prepared in 1880. It coincides, in essentials, with other accounts current in Pinckneyville, years ago, as handed down from the observers.
      One detail that is related in connection with this disaster that is not given in the newspaper account reproduced herewith, concerns the way the proprietor's son escaped. The story is that the engineer, hearing a signal to hoist, raised the cage to the ground level, found it empty, and lowered it to the bottom of the shaft. Confident the hoisting signal had been given, he is said to have raised the cage again, this time, to the tipple, when he found young Blum hanging to the bottom of the cage.
      The forecast that mining operations would be resumed as soon as the high water subsided proved untrue. Big Beaucoup rose and fell for many years before the water was pumped out of the pit.
 
      Until 1918, the old workings of the Blume mine lay unmolested. In them, somewhere, lay the remains of Joseph Niesing.
      Then, in later years, the Hale Coal Co. developed a small mine adjacent to the abandoned shaft.
      J. C. Niesing, one of the family that was bereaved and impoverished by this tragedy in 1880, had become a prominent and substantial citizen of Pinckneyville by the time the Hale mine was developed. Four of his sisters had reached maturity. Their mother died in 1917. At that time, the man who had been left a semi-orphan at the age of six determined that the remains of his father should be recovered from the abandoned mine and given Christian burial beside the body of his companion.
      In late October, 1918, Mr. Niesing enlisted the aid of Edw. Flynn,of DuQuoin. now a state mine inspector, John and Wm. Montgomery. Thos. Hale and George McMath -- all experienced mining men, and arranged to have the Hale Coal Company equipment at their command. Pumps and fans were kept in operation until it was considered safe to enter the old workings.
      The experienced miners, accompanied by Niesing, began an exploration of the mine. They say they found that the roof had sagged in places so that, instead of ordinary clearance in a mine that has a six-foot vein, they had to crawl. A film of mud encrusted everything, indicating that the water, subsiding, had deposited a silt.
      On October 26, 1918, after several days of unsuccessful efforts, they found the body of the victim of the tragedy. It lay face down on the floor of his room, and conditions indicated that he had his working place in order.
      The mineral-laden water that had evidently filled the mine for nearly 39 years, had served to some extent, as a preservative. One hand was petrified, and other portions of the body were right well preserved. The clothing and shoes were in good condition. A sack of tobacco and a small clay pipe, with a "heel" of tobacco tamped tight in the bole, were found in the pockets.
      Metallic equipment had corroded. Pit cars at the bottom, awaiting the long-delayed resumption of operations, were loaded with coal that had not disintegrated. The pit car wheels had rusted down.
      Throughout the mine, the exploring party discovered saw logs and fence rails, brush and other matter entirely foreign to mining operations, that had been swept into the pit when the Beaucoup broke through in 1880.
      The body of Joseph Niesing rests beside that of his widow in St. Bruno's Catholic cemetery, near Pinckneyville. His son and four surviving daughters, Mrs. Anna Faber, Mrs. Theresia Schmeilding and Mrs. Ella Naughton, of St. Louis, and Mrs. Henry Mentel, of near Pinckneyville, realize much satisfaction in that after many years, they have fulfilled this obligation of fillial respect.

Windy Shot Explosion.
No Annual Coal Report records preserved
Coulterville Coal Company Mine
Coulterville, Randolph County, Illinois
1884 Third Biennial Report 1884
Coal Mines and Miners of Illinois - Randolph County
 
Jones & Nebsbit, Coulterville
This shaft is 825 feet deep, and in November gave employment to 30 men and 3 mules. For these there was 3,600 cubic feet of air in circulation, in one current. Connection was made by driving a narrow entry, with their new shaft used as an escapement.
The Review, Decatur, Illinois of January 11, 1883
Lists this disaster as a "fire-damp explosion" occurring on Monday evening (January 8, 1883) in the Jones & Nesbet mine.
The fatalies are :
Frank Brown
A. H. Coombs
Robert Dunlap
Henry Fury
Thomas Hanson
James W. King
Nicholas Kohl
Frank Shanford
Henry Starr, Jr.
Henry Starr, Sr.

1890 Biennial Report 47
Mine Fire
April 20, 1890 -- Three men, N. P. Akeyson, John Eustice & Jacob Williamson, lost their lives while attempting to extinguish a mine fire in Shaft No. 2, operated by the Spring Valley Coal Co. at Spring Valley, Bureau county.
      The actual cause of death in this case was inhaling the fumes and gas given off by the fire, probably carbonic oxide (C. O.), known generally as "white damp."
      This being the most lamentable accident that has occurred in this district since the inception of the present mining law, more than ordinary notice is necessary.
      From informationion gleaned from the most reliable sources, it appears that early on Sunday morning, between 2 and 3 o'clock, April 20, while part of the night force employed in shaft No. 2 were passing from the face of the workings along the intake air-course towards the bottom of the shaft, they discovered a "stopping" on fire. This was built of boards and packed with hay to make it air-tight, and located at the entrance to an abandoned roadway. They attempted to extinguish it by the best means at hand, but failing in this gave the alarm to John Patterson, the night foreman, who summoned his whole force of men and commenced the removal of the burning boards, timbers, hay, etc. In the meantime Mr. John Eustice, the foreman of the mine, had been notified and arrived on the scene and took charge of the work. After three or four hourshard work it was supposed the fire was practically under control, and Mr. Eustice became desirous of passing around to the lee side of the fire to learn if possible its extent. For this purpose he called for two volunteers to accompany him, and Williamson and Akeyson at once responded. They passed along the intake air-course to the bottom of the shaft (south side), passed across the shaft bottom to the north side, and the moment they did so they entered the return air-course and had to encounter the smoke and gas generated by the fire.
      Their companions waited what they thought to be a reasonable time, and when they did not return raised an alarm and commenced the difficult task of finding the three men amid the smoke and gas given off by the fire. When found they were dead, and from the position in which their bodies were found (faces down, heads toward the shaft) and the distance they were apart it is reasonable to suppose that they were retreating towards the shaft when overcome. Williamson was found on the main north entry, 77 yards from the bottom of the shaft. Akeyson was found on the first east entry, 86 yards from the bottom of the shaft, and Eustice on the first east entry and 130 yards from the bottom of the shaft.
      John Eustice had been the under-ground manager of the mine in which he lost his life since 1886 and had the confidence of the company. He was greatly and deservedly respected by the miners of Spring Valley for his uniformly fair dealing toward those under him.
      One problem remains unsolved -- how did this fire originate? That it was not the result of spontaneous combustion is almost certain, because fires of this kind generally give timely warning of their approach by a gradual rising of the temperature until the ignition point is reached, therby giving off an offensive smell that is unmistakable to those accustomed to mine fires.. In this instance no such evidence was noticeable and the conclusion must be, that the wooden stopping was set on fire, either by accident or design.
 
The fatalies are :
 
N. P. Akeyson, of Spring Valley, roadman, aged 37 years, married; leaves a widow and three children.
 
John Eustice, of Spring Valley, mine forman or pit-boss, aged 38 years, married; leaves a widow and six children.
 
Jacob Williamson, of Spring Valley, roadman, aged 39 years, married; leaves a widow and five children.

Fire Damp Explosion
1898 Annual Coal Report 1898 Fatal Accidents
      September 24, 1897, at the mine of the Williamson County Coal Co., at Johnston City, a fire damp explosion occurred at 7 a. m., which proved fatal to
 
Frank Fanaro, aged 45, and single;
 
John Geneli, aged 38, single;
 
Charles Schiller, (died on September 25, 1897), aged 34, single, and
 
Peter Casper, (died on September 26, 1897), aged 37, single,
 
also seriously injuring Robert Britton and Joseph Barlow. Barlow has not been able to work since the accident.
      On the morning of September 24 the men gathered at the pit top, as usual,for work; the fire boss being sick, the mine had not been examined on this morning. Caleb Davis, the mine manager, claims to have told Peter Casper and others who were working in the first and second south entries on the cast side, to remain at the bottom of the shaft till he could come down and examine their working places. Peter Casper, on reaching the bottom, went direct into the first south entry and left his naked light on the outside of the cross-cut and took off his coat and went to the face and started to brush out the fire damp with his coat. After working at this a few minutes he returned and got his naked light and then went and got an empty pit-car and pushed it toward the face. As soon as he was inside the cross cuts a few feet his naked light came in contact with the fire damp, which caused a terrific explosion and the death of the four miners mentioned. The stoppings, doors and timber of the first and second south entries were blown in all directions. Robert Britton and Joseph Barlow were blown several feet along the main east entry by the force of the explosion. Joseph Barlow had his leg broken and the flesh torn, and his head badly bruised. Robert Britton had his left arm broken. Caleb Davis, mine manager, was at the pit top at the time the explosion occurred, and as soon as possible he secured some practical men and started them to work to restore ventilation by putting up temporary doors and stoppings. Peter Casper walked alone to the bottom of the shaft, though severely burnt, and was there met by his friends and conveyed to his boarding house, where he died on the 26th. Chas. Schiller was found in the second south entry by the searching party, trying to make his way to the bottom. At the time of the explosion he was at the mouth, which was 200 feet from the face of the entry, on his knees, taking off his top shirt. He managed to crawl several hundred feet along the entry. He was conveyed to his boarding house, where he died on the 25th. Frank Fanaro was found dead in his room in the first south entry, evidently overcome by after damp, and when found was lying face downward. It was then supposed that this was all that were injured by the explosion, and the searchers went to the top, but after a few minutes it became known that John Geneli was missing. The party then descended the shaft and searched for him. They found him dead in the third room from where he was working, toward the bottom. It was evident that he had tried to find his way out after the explosion, but had become bewildered and strayed into this room. Peter Casper said there was some one calling for help and light when he was on his way out. The last body was taken out at 11 a, m. The company was sinking an escapement at the time of the explosion, which has been completed since. I visited the mine on the afternoon of September 24, and discovered, upon examination of the record book, that the mine had not been examined in the morning before the men were allowed to go to work, nor had it been examined since the morning of September 20, the day on which I made my previous visit. This mine, at the date of this report, is operated by A. W. Crawford, lessee.

 
Sources :
 
1 A Compilation of the Reports of the Mining Industry of Illinois
                from the Earliest Records to Close of the Year 1930
                Department of Mines and Minerals; Springfield, Illinois

2 A Compilation of the Reports of the Mining Industry of Illinois
                from the Earliest Records to 1954
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois;

3 Twenty-second Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1903,
                also the Fifth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                October 1, 1903, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield, -- Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1904

4 Twenty-third Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1904,
                also the Sixth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                October 1, 1904, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield, -- Springfield, Illinois State Journal, State Printers, 1905

5 Twenty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1905,
                also the Seventh Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                September 30, 1905, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield, -- Springfield, Illinois State Journal, State Printers, 1906

6 Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1907,
                also the Ninth Annual Report of the Illinois Free Employment Offices, for the Year Ended
                September 30, 1907, David Ross, Secretary; Springfield, - Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros., State Printers, 1908

7 Twenty-Seventh Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1908
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1909

8 Twenty-Eighth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1909
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1910

9 Twenty-Ninth Annual Coal Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1910
                Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1911

10 Thirtieth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1911
                State Mining Board -- Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1912

11 Thirty-First Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1912
                State Mining Board -- Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1913

12 Thirty-Second Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1913
                State Mining Board -- Springfield, Illinois; Illinois State Journal Co.. State Printers, 1914

13 Thirty-Fourth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1915
                State Mining Board -- Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1915

14 Twenty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1917
                Department of Mines and Minerals; Year Ended June 30, 1917
                Printed by authority of the State of Illinois; Springfield: Illinois State Journal, State Printers, 1917

15 Thirty-Seventh Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1918
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers 1918

16 Thirty-Eighth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1919
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers 1919

17 Fortieth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1921
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Springfield, ILL.; Phillips Bros. Print; 1921

18 Forty-First Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1922
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1922

19 Forty-Second Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1923
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1923

20 Forty-Third Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1924
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1924

21 Forty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1925
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Illinois State Journal Co., Springfield, Illinois., 1926

22 Forty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1926
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1927

23 Forty-Sixth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1927
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1928

24 Forty-Seventh Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1928
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1929

25 Forty-Eighth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1929
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Journal Printing Co., Springfield, ILL., 1930

26 Forty-Ninth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1930
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Illinois Printing Co., Danville, ILL., 1931

27 Thirty-Second Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1913
                State Mining Board
                Springfield, ILL.: Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers, 1914

28 Fifty-First Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1932
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Journal Printing Co., Springfield, ILL., 1933

29 Fifty -Fifth Coal Report of Illinois, 1936
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

30 Sixtieth Coal Report of Illinois, 1941
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

31 Sixty First Coal Report of Illinois, 1942
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

32 Sixty Second Coal Report of Illinois, 1943
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

33 Sixty Third Coal Report of Illinois, 1944
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

34 Sixty Fourth Coal Report of Illinois, 1945
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

35 Sixty Sixth Coal Report of Illinois, 1947
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

36 Sixty-seventh Coal Report of Illinois, 1948
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

37 Sixty-ninth Coal Report of Illinois, 1950
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

38 Seventieth Coal Report of Illinois, 1951
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

39 Third Biennial Report of the Illinois Bureau of Labor Statistics 1884
                Springfield, ILL.; H. W. Rokker, State Printer and Binder; 1884

40 Seventeenth Annual Report of the State Bureau of Labor Statistics, 1898
                Coal in Illinois;    Springfield, ILL; Phillips Bros. State Printers, 1899

41 Thirty-Fifth Annual Coal Report of Illinois, 1916
                State Mining Board -- Springfield, ILL.; Illinois State Journal Co., State Printers 1916

42 Eighty-First Coal Report of Illinois, 1962
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

43 Eighty-Second Coal Report of Illinois, 1963
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

44 Eighty-Seventh Coal Report of Illinois, 1968
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

45 Ninety-Ninth Coal Report of Illinois, 1980
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

46 One-Hundred-Fifth Coal Report of Illinois, 1986
                Department of Mines and Minerals -- Printed by authority of the State of Illinois

47 Sixth Biennial Report of the Bureau of Labor Statistics of Illinois, 1890
                Springfiled, ILL.; H. W. Rokker, State Printer and Binder, 1891

 

 
Coal & Coal Mining in Central Illinois
 
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